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Jewelry classes in phoenix az

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Showing posts with label Phoenix business owner. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Phoenix business owner. Show all posts

Arizona Artist Series: Alex Babic of White Crow Works Q & A


silver jewelry collection with semiprecious stones


How did you get into metalsmithing?

"I developed an obsession with turquoise in 2018. It literally developed overnight. Until then, I used to think it was an "old lady stone", guess I'm an old lady now ;). Anyhow, I bought a few pieces of old Navajo jewelry and the workmanship was amazing, so I wanted to know how it was all put together. I looked up silversmithing classes and came up on Harold studio and the rest is history (not that long of a history I guess).

 
What inspires you?

I find inspiration in different places...antiques, old metal structures and even stones themselves (sometimes I "sit" on them until it "comes" to me what they should be). My love for vintage and rustic shows in textures and designs of my jewelry.


Copper Cuff, Turquoise Rings and Pendants


What is your design process?

Design process...as much as I overplan in all other aspects of my life, jewelry design just comes to me. I start working on something and it develops into a piece of jewelry. Don't get me wrong, I have rocks that I started months ago and have yet to become anything…someday.


What is your favorite tool?

Favorite tool- hands down rolling mill. I love texture, it gives life to a plain piece of metal. You can add depth, designs, whole stories to your piece. It's so forgiving as well, if you don't love what you did, you can wipe the "slate" clean and start all over.


cCopper Cuff, silver earrings, pendants and rings

What is on your bench right now?

There's always a turquoise stone and a buffalo nickel in various stages of completion on my bench.

Silver pendants and rings

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

No upcoming shows at this time, I do plan on doing some in the future.  Meanwhile you can find my work on Instagram @whitecrowworks and Etsy whitecrowworks.etsy.com/."


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6 Tips to Create a Fair Contract (for Yourself & Your Client) When Taking a Jewelry Production Order



Saguaro earrings, twig shapes, polishing wheels
You were asked to use your jewelry metalsmith skills to make something for someone else’s product line.  It’s exciting!  Such opportunities are a good way to make some regular money for a period of time, get your name out there in a new way and work in collaboration with designers, or entrepreneurs.


However, it’s your first offer of this kind, it can also be a bit overwhelming – especially if you haven’t created anything like the particular design requested of you. You want to be fair to your client, and yourself in regards to your time and the cost of materials. What does that look like?
A contract agreement of some kind? 
Turquoise. notepad, wire, jewelry bench, necklaces and earrings

Here are some essential details Harold Studio recommends considering and including in a contract before you agree to take on the work.

1.     Arrange for a beta production period where you are paid to design and create from their specs a sample of prototypes for approval. This way, you know how long a certain piece takes to make and can also better estimate necessary details. Especially, if you’ve never created this kind of jewelry piece/design before.

2.     Once you’ve done this, you’ll be able to have a solid time frame for completing deliverables for a certain number of pieces and can list a solid completion date/time frame to include in the contract.

3.     Once you know your time frame, your production fee (how much you pay yourself hourly) along with the cost of materials can be determined.

4.     Include a non-disclosure clause in your contract. This won’t necessarily guarantee that the pieces you create are fully protected from copycats, but it provides a certain amount of legal protection that sets your expectations if you plan to include 3rd parties in the production process.

5.     Cover your time and expenses, if there are requests for changes of materials, or style applied for another round of prototypes.  Note in the contract that there will be fees incurred for edits, changes to the piece. Be sure to include fees for not just your time and material, but also for any work required by 3rd party service (engraving, for example).

6.     If this piece you’re producing is going to be sold on a continual basis, determine a percentage of your share of each sold piece.  You may need to consider a lower percentage at first, until the salability of a piece is proven and include a clause that says, ‘Upon a certain number, (200, for example) of charms, bracelets, etc. sold in a 4- month time frame, the contract can be revisited for consideration to raise my percentage share of each sale.’

We hope these tips help to put you at ease and feel more confident about taking on production work in the future.  If you need specific tools and workspace to fulfill a production order, Harold Studio offers rental options based on your experience and budget. Learn more here.

Studio with work benches, tools, a polisher and supplies




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