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Showing posts with label Jewelry designer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jewelry designer. Show all posts

Arizona Artist Series: Susan of Wallace Chambers Design Q&A

sterling silver spiral ring


How did you get into metalsmithing?

I had an uncle who made a living as a watchmaker. He also had an interest in stones and made some jewelry. When I was in elementary school he would take me along to hunt for rubies, and on one occasion he bought me a handcrafted Sterling dogwood flower ring. I thought this was so amazing! Later on I became aware of art shows, and grasped the fact that I could actually make a living designing and making jewelry.


What inspires you?

I would have to say beauty. I relate to the fluid nature of metal, and am totally in love with the drama of fire. I find clarity in looking for design, and it is usually a subtle, very unplanned idea that starts my process.

csterling silver cuff



What is your design process?

Very simply, I make it up as I go along!


What is your favorite tool?

I like working with my foredom ..... the finishing process I find
rewarding as the piece is becoming a whole.

Sterling silver twisted pendant on black cord


What is on your bench right now?

 I have been working on silver earrings with raw sea
glass. I decided to make unbacked bezel setting, and still have finishing to accomplish
on them.

sea glass earrings, ring mandrel, projects in process

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

I just finished my season in the Seattle area, where I do a Farmers Market on Saturdays.
My current goal is to focus on my website, and host my own online shows.


Where else can we find your work? 
In Arizona I have work for sale at Taliesin West, in The Frank Lloyd Wright Store. In
Washington I am working on a collection for SAM, Seattle Art Museum for the
spring/summer 2019 season.

https://www.wallacechambersdesign.com/

https://www.etsy.com/shop/WallaceChambers?ref=search_shop_redirect


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Arizona Artist Series: Jen Lin of Hello Pecan Designs Q&A


Green Turquoise Shadow Box Ring


How did you get into metalsmithing?

I have always enjoyed learning and doing anything art and crafts related. I also admired all the pretty silver and turquoise jewelry out there, but had a hard time finding rings or cuffs that fit. I remember thinking maybe someday it would be cool to be able to make it myself. Two years ago, I was looking for a creative outlet to balance out my life and randomly searched the internets for a local metal-smithing class. I found Harold Studio, took the awesome Jewelry 1 class, and have been hooked ever since.  

What inspires you?
Lots of things - a lot of the times just looking at the stone itself sparks some idea for what it could become or what style would fit it best. I had lots of fun looking to nature and the National Parks for inspiration for several pieces. Sometimes running low on supplies (rarely happens right...) generates ideas. It ends up being a semi-fun challenge to see what I can try to create using what I have left until I can restock! 

Turquoise Shadow Box Ring

What is your design process?
I like when I can sit there with the stones I want to work with, along with whatever metal I happen to have on hand in front of me. I arrange things and mix and match all the pieces until I hit upon something that I like and want to wear myself. 

What is your favorite tool?
It's a toss up right now between the fresh stack of yellow bristle polishing discs and the buttery smooth metal file. 

What is on your bench right now? 
Currently on a ring kick and have a couple of different ones going on right now - some simple turquoise ones (my favorite), a few multi-stone rings, a Jasper one. Also finishing up an little cuff. 
Double Band Turquoise Ring

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

Annual Fall Festival of the Arts on October 28, Noon-4pm at the AZ Heritage Center at Papago Park, Tempe. 


Where else can we find your work? 
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Harold Studio Talks Torches, the Type They Use & Options for Those Who Want a Home Workspace


Harold Studio Acetylene tank and a fire extinguisher
Whether you’re a beginning jewelry metalsmith or you’ve been practicing your craft for a few years, you may be wondering which types of torches and gas combinations do what jobs best.  Harold Studio wanted to share why they use acetylene (acetylene-air) -fueled torches and also a few options if you want to set up a home studio for yourself.

Why Acetylene?

·      Because acetylene burns at such a high temperature, students and studio renters alike will always have an adequate amount of heat no matter the size or details of their project.

·      It offers the opportunity to use a range of torch tip sizes for different size projects and design situations.

·      It burns so hot, it really doesn't require an oxygen tank for most things, which means less setup costs for you. When your torch is turned on and the gas reaches the tip, most torches have oxygen holes that merge with the gas to produce an adequately high heat for most silver and gold soldering. This means one less tank, regulator and hose to buy which can really add up. Note: Acetylene is not a good gas to use when working with palladium(a platinum alloy). For that reason, we have an extra propane/oxygen setup for all our palladium, palladium white gold and platinum operations.
a torch being used to melt silver

Torch & Gas Options for Home Studios

·      While initially it can be costlier up front to purchase than other smaller torch /gas tank options, your end cost may be the same (or more, depending on frequency of use). Since the acetylene gas tank is quite large, it will last months to years longer than butane. We also recommend you have adequate and well-ventilated space for all types of torch set-ups. 

·      If you aren’t comfortable with the idea of acetylene in/near your home, you can commit to smaller torch and gas options.  Keep in mind, you’ll be limited to creating much smaller scale designs. Most people we have met start off with a butane and quickly move up to getting a proper tank/torch setup.

·      Propane and oxygen torch combinations are commonly used in home studios as well. Propane, just like acetylene should be kept in a well-ventilated studio space.

·      Butane torches are the smallest available and cheap. They are usually handheld with disposable tanks. However, they have no option to change the torch tip, you can only adjust the size a bit, and they only get hot enough to melt very very small objects such as jump rings. Even trying to solder a simple cabochon ring can prove frustrating because it is usually too big for a butane torch

Regardless of the type of torch and set-up you buy, always keep safety in mind. While we can understand you’re excited to get started, it should go without saying – home fires, accidental gas leaks, and or gas inhalation aren’t worth the risk of not fully understanding the operation of your tank(s).

Do you have questions about the torches Harold Studio uses, or want to learn how to use one? Contact us, or sign up for one of our beginner classes.



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Arizona Artist Series: Roy Benjamin Harlin of Rbenjeejewelry Q&A

How did you get into metalsmithing?
I was searching for an alternative creative outlet removed from the food world that I have spent my working career in.   I needed a new medium that still let me use my hands and tell a story, but without being edible. (ring)
Brass Flower Ring with two stones

What inspires you?
The natural world inspires me the most.  I look to the scenery around me for form and functionality.  Themes are important to me.  I like to set an idea and then open up the drawing books to let the creative juices flow.  I research botanical illustrations, animal anatomy, and maps to help ground my wandering mind. (earrings)

earrings with amazonite




What is your design process?
Draw, draw, draw.  I try to draw in my books daily, even if I feel that is not consistent with what I’m working with at the moment.  It helps me keep a log of what I was feeling at the moment.  I also make prototypes for myself that I can where out and see the response I receive.  The responses help me know if the piece is liked by the collective and not just myself. (earrings)

silver earrings with topaz stones

What is your favorite tool?
I’m currently obsessed with my soldering pick.  It can be a challenge at times, kinda like patting your head and rubbing your belly at the same time.  The benefits out way the juggling act with cleanliness on the piece.


What is on your bench right now? My bench is a bit of mess currently with some research and development happening. I will say that there is a strong presence of opal and rutilated quartz with silver and copper.


various tool, notepad and plants





Do you have any upcoming shows?
I’m doing a show at noons on September 22nd.  I will be showcasing the #MOTHER line.  It is focused on asymmetry, elements, and clean lines.

Where else can we find your work.
Currently you can find my idiot line in Tucson at Popcycle.  I will be at noons starting October.   I also sell custom on line at www.rbenjeejewelry.com
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6 Tips to Create a Fair Contract (for Yourself & Your Client) When Taking a Jewelry Production Order



Saguaro earrings, twig shapes, polishing wheels
You were asked to use your jewelry metalsmith skills to make something for someone else’s product line.  It’s exciting!  Such opportunities are a good way to make some regular money for a period of time, get your name out there in a new way and work in collaboration with designers, or entrepreneurs.


However, it’s your first offer of this kind, it can also be a bit overwhelming – especially if you haven’t created anything like the particular design requested of you. You want to be fair to your client, and yourself in regards to your time and the cost of materials. What does that look like?
A contract agreement of some kind? 
Turquoise. notepad, wire, jewelry bench, necklaces and earrings

Here are some essential details Harold Studio recommends considering and including in a contract before you agree to take on the work.

1.     Arrange for a beta production period where you are paid to design and create from their specs a sample of prototypes for approval. This way, you know how long a certain piece takes to make and can also better estimate necessary details. Especially, if you’ve never created this kind of jewelry piece/design before.

2.     Once you’ve done this, you’ll be able to have a solid time frame for completing deliverables for a certain number of pieces and can list a solid completion date/time frame to include in the contract.

3.     Once you know your time frame, your production fee (how much you pay yourself hourly) along with the cost of materials can be determined.

4.     Include a non-disclosure clause in your contract. This won’t necessarily guarantee that the pieces you create are fully protected from copycats, but it provides a certain amount of legal protection that sets your expectations if you plan to include 3rd parties in the production process.

5.     Cover your time and expenses, if there are requests for changes of materials, or style applied for another round of prototypes.  Note in the contract that there will be fees incurred for edits, changes to the piece. Be sure to include fees for not just your time and material, but also for any work required by 3rd party service (engraving, for example).

6.     If this piece you’re producing is going to be sold on a continual basis, determine a percentage of your share of each sold piece.  You may need to consider a lower percentage at first, until the salability of a piece is proven and include a clause that says, ‘Upon a certain number, (200, for example) of charms, bracelets, etc. sold in a 4- month time frame, the contract can be revisited for consideration to raise my percentage share of each sale.’

We hope these tips help to put you at ease and feel more confident about taking on production work in the future.  If you need specific tools and workspace to fulfill a production order, Harold Studio offers rental options based on your experience and budget. Learn more here.

Studio with work benches, tools, a polisher and supplies




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