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Jewelry classes in phoenix az

Jewelry classes in phoenix az
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Showing posts with label Harold Jewelry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Harold Jewelry. Show all posts

Harold Studio Featured Supplier Series: Gem Resources, International Provides Quality & a Large Selection of Stones to Satisfy a Range of Jewelry Design Ideas.

Gem Resources, International is a valued supplier for Harold Jewelry. We recommend them to you, because whether you are just starting out in your jewelry design education or, you’re a seasoned artisan, you’ll find a stone that’s perfect for your design idea. 
3 stack rings with gemstones





The Minnesota-based company offers a wide selection of faceted natural and lab-created gems that come in styles such as rose-cut, checkerboard and bullet. Rough-cut gems are an option in stones like citrine, aquamarine, white topaz, a few kinds of garnet and peridot to name some examples. Plus, they have natural and lab-created stone cabochons (also called ‘cabs’), which are known to be easier to set than faceted or rough gems. They also have a choice of drilled stones or drops. Some of these drilled stones come in novel shapes – like boots!

Blue topaz on quartz


Are you in search of details about certain jewelry making processes for your latest design? Gem Resources International’s website has a nice section of ‘How-to Guides.’ Also, if you want to find links to industry publications, educational institutions or guilds you’ll find these in their ‘Shop Talk’ section.

 Another benefit to shopping with Gem Resources international is their specials on stones. They run monthly specials.  One of their recent sales included half off the price of gems like - mother-of-pearl, lapis, turquoise, rose quartz, rainbow moonstone, amethyst, Australian Opal, Oregon Sunstone and Montana Agate.

Do you have questions about how a stone, or stones, you purchased from Gem Resources International will suit your jewelry idea? Do you wonder if they will work for a custom design, or a project in one of our upcoming classes? The staff at Harold Studio is happy to help you and answer any questions you may have before you start a class or a creation.

Visit our site again soon for our next ‘Featured Supplier’ blog. If you’re a gemstone fan, you’re probably pretty familiar with them, and may have shopped with them already. They are reputed to be one of the world’s largest resources for everything jewelry and jewelry design!

By: Amy Juneau
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Tips on Taking Good Jewelry Product Shots from a Professional Photographer – Part 1.


Tips on Taking Good Jewelry Product Shots from a Professional Photographer – Part 1.  
By: Amy Juneau

Phoenix Photographer, Sage, of Desert Sage Photography, met with me recently to share some basic tips on how to shoot good jewelry product shots. She has 6 years of experience as a jewelry product photographer and 10 years of experience photographing weddings.  She’s been a real gem (pun intended) in creating quality photos for Harold Jewelry.  
jewelry photo tips

Check out her advice in answer to my questions below:

AJ: What do you recommend for removing/avoiding dust and debris in close up shots?

S:    It depends on what background you wish to photograph the jewelry on. A white background looks professional, but it can be tricky, as it shows lint and random debris easily. Keep a lint roller and or tape handy (Sage always asks her jewelry artist clients what is their preference for a background before a shoot).

If you have a photo editing software, like Photoshop, and are somewhat knowledgeable of it, you can remove flecks of debris or lint easily that way.

Lastly, though It seems obvious, it’s helpful to wash hands before taking any jewelry photos. It keeps the oil from your skin from appearing on the jewelry, particularly on close-up shots.

AJ: What do you advise for removing weird or distracting shadows in a jewelry product shot?



tips on jewelry photography

S: If the jewelry isn’t a reflective piece, a light box is helpful. 
If you don't have one, you can use a cardboard box with a square cut out of the side covered with white fabric.  Place your light source, (remote flash or clamp lamp) outside the fabric covered cut out square and directed inside the box.  The fabric will act as a light diffuser and even out the shadows on your jewelry.   It's good to try to keep your light source relative to the size of your jewelry.

AJ: What do you recommend in regard to indoor vs. outdoor lighting when limited to a home studio?

jewelry photo tips

S: A clamp light with powerful bulb is best if you're stuck with indoor shots. Use a white board/paper opposing the light/flash source to even out the light source.
As for outdoor shots, there are optimal times of day. Avoid twilight, sunset and high-noon. Mid-morning around 9 am and Mid-afternoon between 2 and 3 pm are best.

AJ: Thank you, Sage! You’re such a wealth of information, and we ran out of time, so this will be followed by a ‘Product Photo Tips - part 2’ next month.


S: Thank you, Amy! I look forward to it.

 Check out some of Sage’s photography for Harold Jewelry and for her other clients here.



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