moon phase jewelry

moon phase jewelry
Moon phase

spinner ring

spinner ring
Shop jewelry

Jewelry classes in phoenix az

Jewelry classes in phoenix az
Classes
Showing posts with label Arizona Artist. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Arizona Artist. Show all posts

Arizona Artist Series: Stefanie Dicker of Bezel and Brass Q & A

Sterling Silver Botswana Necklace

How did you get into metalsmithing?

Years ago, my grandma gave me her wedding ring and told me that I could reset the stones, if I wanted to do so. I felt that the best way to honor her, would be to learn how to reset the stones myself. Ironically, I no longer want to reset the stones. I cherish the memories that I have of her wearing that ring. I want to preserve the ring and the memories.

Sterling Silver and Brass Geometrical Earrings

What inspires you?

I'm very inspired by other cultures. Specifically, Native American and Hispanic cultures. I love the story, the spirit, the richness and the detail.



Bezel and Brass Silver Hoops with Brass Dangles

What is your design process?

 I tend to be a more methodical person, so, I'm not one to "wing it".  I almost always have a plan before I start working on a piece. Usually, I end up deviating or modifying somewhere along the way. That's the part of the process that I have a tricky relationship with. I don't like uncertainty, although, uncertainty can be our best teacher.

Bezel and Brass Silver Jasper Ring

What is your favorite tool and why?

 My favorite tool changes, depending on the pieces that I'm working on. Consistently, though, I love my rotary tool. The finishing process is cathartic for me.


Bezel and Brass Work Bench with various tools


What is on your bench right now?

I'm finishing up some chrysoprase earrings and starting a collection for a salon in Minnesota.

Bezel and Brass Silver Varasite Ring




Where can we find your work?
-Local Nomad on Camelback and Central, localnomadshop.com
-late spring/early summer at Mérite House of Beauty in Minnetonka, MN
-Etsy, bezelandbrass.etsy.com


0

Arizona Artist Series: Alex Babic of White Crow Works Q & A


silver jewelry collection with semiprecious stones


How did you get into metalsmithing?

"I developed an obsession with turquoise in 2018. It literally developed overnight. Until then, I used to think it was an "old lady stone", guess I'm an old lady now ;). Anyhow, I bought a few pieces of old Navajo jewelry and the workmanship was amazing, so I wanted to know how it was all put together. I looked up silversmithing classes and came up on Harold studio and the rest is history (not that long of a history I guess).

 
What inspires you?

I find inspiration in different places...antiques, old metal structures and even stones themselves (sometimes I "sit" on them until it "comes" to me what they should be). My love for vintage and rustic shows in textures and designs of my jewelry.


Copper Cuff, Turquoise Rings and Pendants


What is your design process?

Design process...as much as I overplan in all other aspects of my life, jewelry design just comes to me. I start working on something and it develops into a piece of jewelry. Don't get me wrong, I have rocks that I started months ago and have yet to become anything…someday.


What is your favorite tool?

Favorite tool- hands down rolling mill. I love texture, it gives life to a plain piece of metal. You can add depth, designs, whole stories to your piece. It's so forgiving as well, if you don't love what you did, you can wipe the "slate" clean and start all over.


cCopper Cuff, silver earrings, pendants and rings

What is on your bench right now?

There's always a turquoise stone and a buffalo nickel in various stages of completion on my bench.

Silver pendants and rings

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

No upcoming shows at this time, I do plan on doing some in the future.  Meanwhile you can find my work on Instagram @whitecrowworks and Etsy whitecrowworks.etsy.com/."


0

Arizona Artist Series: Susan of Wallace Chambers Design Q&A

sterling silver spiral ring


How did you get into metalsmithing?

I had an uncle who made a living as a watchmaker. He also had an interest in stones and made some jewelry. When I was in elementary school he would take me along to hunt for rubies, and on one occasion he bought me a handcrafted Sterling dogwood flower ring. I thought this was so amazing! Later on I became aware of art shows, and grasped the fact that I could actually make a living designing and making jewelry.


What inspires you?

I would have to say beauty. I relate to the fluid nature of metal, and am totally in love with the drama of fire. I find clarity in looking for design, and it is usually a subtle, very unplanned idea that starts my process.

csterling silver cuff



What is your design process?

Very simply, I make it up as I go along!


What is your favorite tool?

I like working with my foredom ..... the finishing process I find
rewarding as the piece is becoming a whole.

Sterling silver twisted pendant on black cord


What is on your bench right now?

 I have been working on silver earrings with raw sea
glass. I decided to make unbacked bezel setting, and still have finishing to accomplish
on them.

sea glass earrings, ring mandrel, projects in process

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

I just finished my season in the Seattle area, where I do a Farmers Market on Saturdays.
My current goal is to focus on my website, and host my own online shows.


Where else can we find your work? 
In Arizona I have work for sale at Taliesin West, in The Frank Lloyd Wright Store. In
Washington I am working on a collection for SAM, Seattle Art Museum for the
spring/summer 2019 season.

https://www.wallacechambersdesign.com/

https://www.etsy.com/shop/WallaceChambers?ref=search_shop_redirect


0

Arizona Artist Series: Jen Lin of Hello Pecan Designs Q&A


Green Turquoise Shadow Box Ring


How did you get into metalsmithing?

I have always enjoyed learning and doing anything art and crafts related. I also admired all the pretty silver and turquoise jewelry out there, but had a hard time finding rings or cuffs that fit. I remember thinking maybe someday it would be cool to be able to make it myself. Two years ago, I was looking for a creative outlet to balance out my life and randomly searched the internets for a local metal-smithing class. I found Harold Studio, took the awesome Jewelry 1 class, and have been hooked ever since.  

What inspires you?
Lots of things - a lot of the times just looking at the stone itself sparks some idea for what it could become or what style would fit it best. I had lots of fun looking to nature and the National Parks for inspiration for several pieces. Sometimes running low on supplies (rarely happens right...) generates ideas. It ends up being a semi-fun challenge to see what I can try to create using what I have left until I can restock! 

Turquoise Shadow Box Ring

What is your design process?
I like when I can sit there with the stones I want to work with, along with whatever metal I happen to have on hand in front of me. I arrange things and mix and match all the pieces until I hit upon something that I like and want to wear myself. 

What is your favorite tool?
It's a toss up right now between the fresh stack of yellow bristle polishing discs and the buttery smooth metal file. 

What is on your bench right now? 
Currently on a ring kick and have a couple of different ones going on right now - some simple turquoise ones (my favorite), a few multi-stone rings, a Jasper one. Also finishing up an little cuff. 
Double Band Turquoise Ring

Do you have any upcoming shows? 

Annual Fall Festival of the Arts on October 28, Noon-4pm at the AZ Heritage Center at Papago Park, Tempe. 


Where else can we find your work? 
0

Arizona Artist Series: Roy Benjamin Harlin of Rbenjeejewelry Q&A

How did you get into metalsmithing?
I was searching for an alternative creative outlet removed from the food world that I have spent my working career in.   I needed a new medium that still let me use my hands and tell a story, but without being edible. (ring)
Brass Flower Ring with two stones

What inspires you?
The natural world inspires me the most.  I look to the scenery around me for form and functionality.  Themes are important to me.  I like to set an idea and then open up the drawing books to let the creative juices flow.  I research botanical illustrations, animal anatomy, and maps to help ground my wandering mind. (earrings)

earrings with amazonite




What is your design process?
Draw, draw, draw.  I try to draw in my books daily, even if I feel that is not consistent with what I’m working with at the moment.  It helps me keep a log of what I was feeling at the moment.  I also make prototypes for myself that I can where out and see the response I receive.  The responses help me know if the piece is liked by the collective and not just myself. (earrings)

silver earrings with topaz stones

What is your favorite tool?
I’m currently obsessed with my soldering pick.  It can be a challenge at times, kinda like patting your head and rubbing your belly at the same time.  The benefits out way the juggling act with cleanliness on the piece.


What is on your bench right now? My bench is a bit of mess currently with some research and development happening. I will say that there is a strong presence of opal and rutilated quartz with silver and copper.


various tool, notepad and plants





Do you have any upcoming shows?
I’m doing a show at noons on September 22nd.  I will be showcasing the #MOTHER line.  It is focused on asymmetry, elements, and clean lines.

Where else can we find your work.
Currently you can find my idiot line in Tucson at Popcycle.  I will be at noons starting October.   I also sell custom on line at www.rbenjeejewelry.com
0

Arizona Artist Series: Meghan of Girl's Run Fast Q&A

Meghan makes jewelry for runners, triathletes, duathletes, swimmers, cyclists, yogis with her business Girls Run Fast. Jewelry to celebrate your accomplishment and more.


1 silver charm with a copper bike and 1 silver charm with a runner




Meghan makes jewelry for runners, triathletes, duathletes, swimmers, cyclists, yogis with her business Girls Run Fast. Jewelry to celebrate your accomplishment and more.

How did you get into metalsmithing?

I took my first class when I was at the university working on my BFA, it sparked my interest then but at that time I could not  fit any more classes into my schedule. I got back into it and  started taking classes again  twenty years later after teaching art for many years.



Saw Frame Cut lube and filesWhat inspires you?

My life experiences and the experiences of the people in my life.  I started making my running pendants when I was training for a marathon and continue to get ideas for new pendants from events in our lives. One of my newer designs is a runner with a dog, inspired by our new dog.


Silver pendant with copper bike, runner and swimmer

What is your design process?

I begin with drawing  several designs until they develop into something I am happy with. Once I am happy with the design then I will cut the figures out of copper. The stamped designs on the background are different every time.  I create these designs on instinct without any planning.



What is your favorite tool?

My favorite tool is my saw. I enjoy cutting out the figures and challenging myself to cut them out smaller or with better detail each time.



What is on your bench right now?

Runner pendants and rings in process as well as some cabochons  I am working on making into pendants for gifts.
0

MissHotcakes


Arizona Artist Series: Rebecca/ MissHotcakes Q&A


Rebecca of MissHotcakes has a quirky unique style that mixes her love of the vintage and weird in a beautiful way through her jewelry designs. Learn more about her process and style in our latest Arizona Artist segment below!



labradorite ring




How did you get into metalsmithing?


Jewelry making has been something I’ve been doing since high school, maybe earlier, so it’s always been an interest of mine. It started with beads, and then in the late 90s, there were hemp necklaces/bracelets. More recently, I was on the lookout for vintage buttons, and I also was using felt for a bit.
I enjoyed that, but I found that I wanted to elevate my skill set, which led me to taking a course at Harold in 2015. I fell in love with the process and the ability to really create something out of nothing. 
Creating is just such an important thing to me, and metalsmithing is really my favorite way to scratch my creative itch.
saguaro necklace and pin

What inspires you?

So much! I find so much inspiration from the desert around me here in Phoenix. Nature in general is a huge inspiration. 
I’ve also always been drawn to some of the darker things in life – skulls and skeletons, witchcraft and other pagan symbols, the night sky! Stars and the moon have always been something I feel drawn to.
Recently, I featured Irina Ionesco’s photography on my Instagram page because her photos are just so amazing and are such an inspiration to me. They’re dark but beautiful and unique, which is exactly the aesthetic  I am after. If you aren’t familiar, I really suggest checking her out.

What is your design process?

Usually, I have one thing, whether it be a stone, a technique, or an idea that will drive the rest of the piece. Most things I plan and sketch out and think over, but there are some pieces that just come together organically that I hadn’t planned on at all. 
I’m also usually not one to start and finish a project all at one time. Instead, I have about 3 things going all at once that I work on in spurts.

What is your favorite tool?

My favorite tool is my tweezers. Why, I don’t know, but I have to have them!

What is on your bench right now?

I have a onyx and moonstone ring that I’m nearly finished with.  
I also have a picture jasper that I’m about to start working with. I’m going to use bronze, which I’ve never used before, so I’m excited for that. 
Of course, I have other things in the works, but I’ll leave it there!


ring in making


Loving this Psychic hand necklace currently available on her site. Go, take a look and shop now! At misshotcakes.com
brass and silver hand necklace

0

Sacred Spirit Gems

Arizona Artist Series: Mark Plehn Q&A


Mark of Sacred Spirit Gems has a stirring array of crystals and crystal healing jewelry with stone combinations that are carefully arranged to create optimal healing results for the wearer. He was kind enough to answer some questions in our Arizona Artist Series about his design process and what inspires him.


custom ruby ring


How did you get into metalsmithing?

I began the initial metalsmithing aspect of my jewelry career learning how to set gemstone cabochons with sterling silver wire.  Almost twenty years ago I was fortunate enough to have met an amazing silver wire stone setting artist.  She had a small table at a very small northern Arizona town craft fair and after some conversation and my bold request for her to teach me, we ended up at my dining room table a few days later as she passed on her knowledge!  I was and am so grateful for her open-hearted sharing of her talents for my benefit and I appreciate the gift I received that day every time I set up a new wire wrapping design.  My ongoing desire to expand my jewelry creating skills then led me to Harold Studio and Johanna.  I feel like now the sky’s the limit after finding another amazing artist willing to share their metalsmithing gifts and knowledge!

Quartz necklaces made custom for healing

What inspires you?

For me the inspiration for almost all of my work is the gemstones and their amazing ability to receive, store, amplify and transmit light, color and mineralogical vibrations.  I’m inspired by nature and natural organic forms and I’m also very inspired by antique designs: Victorian era, the jewelry of the 20s, 30s, 40s and sometimes even ancient antiquity designs from Egypt, etc. 

What is your design process?

custom labradorite necklace
As a certified Crystologist my initial design process always begins with the energy of the gemstones and the intention for the piece I’ll be creating.  Is the piece I’m working on a single stone, stand alone pendant for a chain or is it a pendant that will be attached to gemstone healing combination design?  In what form will this healing design be most effective for my client?......in a necklace or bracelet form?  Maybe it needs to be an anklet because the client uses their hands and a bracelet would be in their way.   Most of my designs are custom healing designs with gemstones and crystals specific to addressing physical health challenges or intentional consciousness enhancement designs.  All of my designs are centered around the crystals or gemstones and I do my best to let the stones tell me the best way to create them into intentional consciousness enhancement and wearable healing art.

What is your favorite tool?

I’d have to say my favorite tool is my flexshaft.  I love all the different things I can do with it in grinding, texturing, finishing and polishing.  Not to mention the ability to change my tips to stone carving tips for working on gemstone carvings, etc.  I feel like I’ve only begun in exploring all the things I will be able to do with this wonderful tool.




custom made rings in Arizona

What is on your bench right now?

On my bench right now are a number of in process pieces.  I always have several different pieces I’m working on and usually switch between them……if I get stuck or frustrated with one thing I’m working on, I switch to something else to keep me fluid and enjoying the process.  There is currently a custom double ammonite piece I’m setting in an unusual way as well as a number of quartz crystals pendants, a ruby ring and a ring repair project as well.
what is on my jeweler's bench

 
0

Dear Jewelry


Arizona Artist Series: Katherine Londen Q&A

Katherine makes jewelry that mixes edgy lines with organic shapes and she always uses beautiful stones as a focal point. She just launched her etsy store, shopdearjewelry.com and we can't wait to see what she comes up with next. 

silver long earrings with topaz
Stick Earrings

How did you get into making jewelry?


I first became interested in metalsmithing in college, when I worked for a year as a sales assistant at a boutique jewelry store in Tucson called Viir Jewelers. I learned a little about gemstones and how they form in the earth, what gives them their colors, where they come from, etc. and I was fascinated by it. Jewelry making is really the intersection of art and science. I think that is the coolest thing! Years later, I read an article about Harold Studio and when I ended up taking a job downtown, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to take a class and learn. I've since taken several different classes.

What inspires you?


Science and nature - the things we see all around us, like our environment and its creatures, but also the things that are hidden to our eyes, like diatoms, which you can only see with a microscope. I'm also inspired by gemstones themselves - a particular color or shape or type of gemstone will get my creative thoughts racing!


What is your design process?


Bubble ring with tube set diamond in 14k gold
Silver Diamond Ring
For me, it's mostly about the stone itself, because I want the stone to look its best. Its color, shape, etc. all give me ideas. Sometimes those ideas work, and other times I have to rework the ideas!

What is your favorite tool?


I don't know that it's my favorite, but the tool I use the most and that I find comes in handy all the time for all sorts of things is my bastard mill file. Also, I couldn't live without my optivisor.


What is on your bench right now?



I rent studio space from Harold Studio (thank you!!!) so right now, nothing. But there's usually my optivisor, saw, a bunch of stones, silver sheet and wire, files, bristle or silicon discs, and some works in progress. I think you can testify to the fact that a lot of the contents of my toolbox, in fact, find their way to the bench, creeping across two spaces rather than one. The organization aspect of my jewelry making is a work in progress itself, haha!
0

A metalsmith and her wall hangings

Arizona Artist Series: Melanie Channon Q&A

Melanie Channon is a scientist who makes beautiful wall hangings that will leave you breathless. 
One of her pieces, Octopus is currently being featured at Arizona's Herbergur Theatre's Face Off Exhibit with some other amazing artists until January. 

Metal and stone wall hanging of an octopus
You can see more of her work on her instagram



How did you get into metalsmithing?

  I took a class at Harold Studio in February 2013 and immediately fell in love with manipulating metal.

What inspires you?

  Metalwork made for religious purposes and/or royalty in the middle ages.  Pieces like reliquaries and crowns that were obviously time consuming and painstaking to make.  I really admire the dedication it took to make them.  I strive to reflect that kind of dedication in my pieces, even though they are not for religion or royalty.  

What is your design process?

  I try to think of things that I personally like (skulls, animals, characters) that would accommodate a lot of metal techniques (gems, rivets, etc.) and interesting details (textures and patterns).  But really some of what I consider to be my most creative design ideas have come from the logistics of trying to put the piece together.  For example, some of the designs that I do with rivets were partly out of necessity to attach the different components together.  

  However, I also purposefully try to use different techniques for each piece, both to challenge myself, and to distinguish the style of the pieces from each other. So, sometimes the image or character that I come up with is from what I think would be a cool image that is suited to whatever new or different technique I want to use.

Metal and stone owl wall hanging



What is your favorite tool?

I think this changes around a little depending on what I'm working on.  But, because I do so many rivets I really love my flush cutters.  I paid a little more for a decent pair, and I'm really happy I did. https://www.riogrande.com/Product/Italian-Flush-Cutters-TR5000R/111105 I also love all of my stamping/chasing/repousse tools.  Some of which I've made myself and some that I've purchased.  I probably like the ones I've purchased a little more, just because I'm not that good at making them yet, lol.  I also could not live without my miter cutting jig; I can't even cut a bezel straight without it. https://www.riogrande.com/Product/Economy-Miter-Cutting-Vise-and-Jig/112700

What is on your bench right now?


Coincidentally, both my flush cutters and my miter cutting jig, along with various sizes of drills, a center punch, a small ball peen hammer, a large half round file, safety goggles, metal scraps, and my medusa piece (but I'm actually not working on Medusa at the moment; I'm working on signature tags for my skull and owl pieces).  Plus, all the other stuff that normally lives on my bench: all my other hammers, other files, stamping/chasing/repousse tools, pliers, saw, flex shaft accessories, bench block, wood block for drilling, etc.

messy bench with metal and tools scattered around

0